Tuesday, February 14, 2012

Killed in French and Indian War – Samuel Dakin

B. 23 Sep 1700 in Concord, Massachusetts
M. 13 Dec 1722 in Concord, Massachusetts
Wife: Mercy Minot
D. 20 Jul 1758 near Lake George, New York

Saumel Dakin was born in Concord, Massachusetts on September 23, 1700 to Joseph Dakin and Dorothy Worcester, one of nine children. He married Mercy Minot in Concord on December 13, 1722. They relocated to the town of Sudbury, their farm being on the road running north to Concord very near the edge of town. Samuel and Mercy had eight children born between 1725 and about 1744.

In about 1745, Samuel was appointed ensign of the "Second Company of Foot" in Sudbury. On September 10, 1755, during the French and Indian War, he was made captain in Josiah Brown's regiment. The muster-roll of his company contained forty-eight names.

Part of a letter Samuel wrote to his wife Mercy dated September 26, 1755 survives: "I am in good health and my company are so obedient to me and so loving one to another that it makes my life exceeding comfortable and pleasant. I have never yet heard one thwarting word in my company, but they seem all to have a brotherly care one for another, and have never heard one profane word among them, and their forwardness to attend religious exercises is delightful to me so that I have many mercies."

In May 1758, Samuel received orders to march his company to Fort Edward, near Lake George, New York. As he set out on the journey, he wrote a memorandum on May 23rd: "This day renew this covenant with God, and while going on an expedition against Canada I have left myself wholly in the hands of God, to be at His disposal in life or death."

Samuel arrived at the fort about the middle of June. He wrote in a letter on June 10th, "[The men of the company] are all well, and I hope I shall be very happy in my company, and they are very ready to attend prayers and singing of Psalms which we have practiced on our journey." In another letter on July 11th, he wrote to his family, "And now my dear wife and children, I desire you would not distress yourselves about me but commit me in your prayers to God to be wholly at his disposal and I hope by his preserving providence I shall after awhile rejoice with you again in my own house; but if not I hope we shall all rejoice together in heaven which will be spiritually better." Before he closed his letter, he asked for their prayers for himself, his men, and the whole army.

On July 20th, the Indians attacked a group of 10 men who were out scouting not far from the fort. Some of the men in the fort went out to assist the group, but the Indians shot at them and 14 were killed including Samuel. One man fell near the fort and the soldiers were able to retrieve his body, but the others were all scalped by the Indians. When the Indians left, the remains of all of the dead were buried in one grave together.

An epitaph was written for Samuel by his orderly sergeant, William Rice:

Good by, Capt. Dakin Samuell
In a battle near Lake George he fell.

Children:
1. Joseph Dakin – B. 20 May 1725, Sudbury, Massachusetts; D. 22 Aug 1727, Sudbury, Massachusetts

2. Oliver Dakin – B. 20 Mar 1727, Sudbury, Massachusetts

3. Samuel Dakin – B. 17 May 1731, Sudbury, Massachusetts

4. Mercy Dakin – B. 14 Apr 1733, Sudbury, Massachusetts

5. Beulah Dakin – B. 22 Mar 1735, Sudbury, Massachusetts

6. Dorothy Dakin – B. about 1739, Sudbury, Massachusetts

7. Mary Dakin – B. 28 Aug 1741, Sudbury, Massachusetts; M. Timothy Baker (1730-1810), 15 Jan 1760, Littleton, Massachusetts

8. Hannah Dakin – B. about 1744, Sudbury, Massachusetts

Sources:
Concord, Massachusetts births, marriages and deaths, 1635-1850, George Tolman, 1895
Early Massachusetts marriages prior to 1800, Frederic W. Bailey, 1879
A History of the town of Concord, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, Lemuel Shattuck, 1835
The History of Sudbury, Massachusetts, 1638-1889, Alfred Sereno Hudson, 1889
The Pilgrims of Boston and their descendants, Thomas Bridgman, 1856

1 comment:

  1. Samuel Dakin was my 6th great grandfather on my father's mother's side.

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